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6 ways to Manage Overload

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Read “6 ways to Manage Overload,” Transcript below then explain the ideas and details presented in the transcript below. [MUSIC PLAYING] I think no one would disagree with the fact that in today’s workplace, there’s an incredible amount of work overload that just that everybody is grappling with. There’s the increased demands of work, there’s the internet, there’s the 24/7 lifestyle. Well, I’m joined by psychologist Eve Ash, who’s going to tell us about the six ways to manage overload that she has discovered. Eve, tell me a little bit about the research, first of all, about managing overload that you’ve read. Well, I should really be a case study for this program because I thought I managed myself quite well, but as I started to really get into the depth of this program, I realized there were so many more things I could be doing better. OK, well what are of the discoveries? What’s the first major discovery that you made from reading the research that you could apply to your own work situation? OK, well there’s a number of physical, environmental things that you can do. For example, there’s been research to show that having a larger screen with your computer makes you far more efficient. In fact, a woman did a study– called Mary Czerwinski– we found that office workers completed tasks 44% faster with larger screens. Why is that? Because they can just see? The ease of navigation, and having their documents, and being able to do that. So immediately, that’s one. Another one is the chair that you have. In fact, I found the most amazing chair, which I’d like to order, that really accommodates an ergonomic position far better than even all the ones in the last 10 or 20 years that people have been saying. Because you really don’t want to get back ache, and you don’t want to get RSI, so you want to be in the best possible position. And I’m assuming that a lot of people have sedentary jobs. So with the time at the computer, you want it to be terrific. Also there’s things like the right temperature to work in. For example, 22 degrees Centigrade or 72 degrees Fahrenheit is the ideal temperature. Is that so? Because often you see people or you see workplaces where it’s much cooler or much warmer. And people get quite stressed or they’re not working. In fact, they’ve done studies which show a 2% drop in productivity for every degree of temperature change. Up or down? Up or down. So things like that. The clean air. In fact, they’re now doing buildings to really make the air and all the way in which we work at our best. Because they were finding that people were having Sick Building Syndrome. Yes. I believe that’s not just related to the air quality, but also carpets and paint on walls give off certain chemicals that can cause problems. In fact, there’s a building near to where I live, in downtown Melbourne, which is the first six-star office building. And they’ve done an incredible amount of very innovative work to circulate air and do all sorts of things. So I guess that’s the way the future. There’s even evidence to show that the more daylight you have the more effective you’ll be. And I’ve found this particularly interesting, because, as you know, I like to do a lot of my work at night. But I’m finding that the quality of my work, in daylight is actually very good, but why I haven’t liked it is because of the interruptions during the day. But, in fact, there was a study that showed that students in classrooms with more daylight progressed 20% faster on math comprehension tests and 20% faster on reading comprehension. And that’s if they’ve got daylight as opposed to– As opposed to less daylight– a lot less daylight. So the more daylight the better. What about colors? Because I’ve read a bit of stuff that colors very much affect your mood and your productivity. I always remember– and I thought this was kind of funny– that apparently they often paint the inside of prisons pink because pink has a kind of calmin

6 ways to Manage Overload

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